E-safety

Welcome to this e-Safety update to parents detailing the e-Safety provision at OBH. Back in November, an E-Safety expert from the NSPCC held workshops with Years 5 & 6, and also had a session with parents. He mentioned the relationship they have developed with O2 to develop a range of resources devoted to keeping children safe online, including a telephone helpline. Many parents would appreciate some guidance on how to deal with this subject, and the best advice we can give is to maintain a conversation with your children, and to reinforce the message that they must feel able to talk to someone if anything worries them. These NSPCC/O2 pages are as good a place as any.

https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children-safe/online-safety/

The CEOP site is very good and we make use of videos provided by CEOP in our e-safety sessions.

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents/

Another site with plenty of useful information is

https://www.internetmatters.org

The topic features prominently on our Science and Technology Twitter feed (@OBH_Sci_Tech) which we would urge you to follow, and I am always happy to be contacted if you have any particular concerns.

In addition to the NSPCC workshops, Year 3 have done some e-Safety work in their ICT lessons and Year 4 will shortly be doing likewise. Year 7 had a workshop as part of their PSHE and Year 8 will be doing the same.

Karl Hopwood, who is in our opinion the best speaker around on e-Safety matters, will be visiting the school early in the Michaelmas term to run workshops with children and to speak to parents.

Very much in the news at the moment is the ‘Momo Challenge’. There have been a huge number of scare stories circulating – especially on social media about the character with bulging eyes – originating from a Japanese doll artist – who sets children dangerous challenges, such as self-harming. Evidence points to this being a false scare story. For a balanced report, I suggest visiting

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-47393510

A very good article on internetmatters.org advises that the best way forward is to use the opportunity to talk to your children about safe online practices.


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